THE SAFFRON


PROPERTY AND BENEFITS

SAFFRON, NOT ONLY A SPICE

Saffron is a precious and complex spice. In fact, it contains over 150 volatile compounds and aromas, including a large number of non-volatile active ingredients such as:

CAROTENOIDS: they fight free radicals, which are responsible for cellular ageing. They have antioxidant and anticancer effects and they help against the decay of brain cells. Saffron has the highest content of carotenoids (1000 times more than that of a carrot). It contains soluble carotenoids, so they can be very easily assimilated.

VITAMIN B1: very important for the metabolism (it transforms sugar into energy) in the growth process.

VITAMIN B2: necessary for the cellular metabolism, it strengths the immune system, it helps assimilate iron. *VITAMIN B1 and VITAMIN B2 in saffron are present in excellent quantity. Moreover saffron contains a very good quantity of vitamin C and B6.

SAFRANALE: it activates metabolism, it is assimilated very fast and make it easier to produce gastric juices. It helps digestion. The safranale is the element which determines the typical saffron smell.

THE SAFFRON


PROPERTY AND BENEFITS

SAFFRON, NOT ONLY A SPICE

Saffron is a precious and complex spice. In fact, it contains over 150 volatile compounds and aromas, including a large number of non-volatile active ingredients such as:

CAROTENOIDS: they fight free radicals, which are responsible for cellular ageing. They have antioxidant and anticancer effects and they help against the decay of brain cells. Saffron has the highest content of carotenoids (1000 times more than that of a carrot). It contains soluble carotenoids, so they can be very easily assimilated.

VITAMIN B1: very important for the metabolism (it transforms sugar into energy) in the growth process.

VITAMIN B2: necessary for the cellular metabolism, it strengths the immune system, it helps assimilate iron. *VITAMIN B1 and VITAMIN B2 in saffron are present in excellent quantity. Moreover saffron contains a very good quantity of vitamin C and B6.

SAFRANALE: it activates metabolism, it is assimilated very fast and make it easier to produce gastric juices. It helps digestion. The safranale is the element which determines the typical saffron smell.

SAFFRON, BETWEEN MYTH AND LEGEND

According to the Greek mythology, it is said that a very beautiful young man, Crocus, who used to live sheltered by the gods, fell in love with the nymph Smilace, who was god Hermes’ favorite. The punishment was immediate and the man was changed into a bulb.

Both Greeks and Romans used saffron to scatter the floor of temples or to perfume their houses.

Even Pliny used to recount the common aphrodisiac use of saffron, in fact he stated it as capable of stimulating sexual activity but mostly of increasing women’s greed. Maybe, paraphrasing this, it could be defined “a love potion”. Sidons and Styrians used to dye their women’s veils.

SAFFRON, BETWEEN MYTH AND LEGEND

According to the Greek mythology, it is said that a very beautiful young man, Crocus, who used to live sheltered by the gods, fell in love with the nymph Smilace, who was god Hermes’ favorite. The punishment was immediate and the man was changed into a bulb.

Both Greeks and Romans used saffron to scatter the floor of temples or to perfume their houses.

Even Pliny used to recount the common aphrodisiac use of saffron, in fact he stated it as capable of stimulating sexual activity but mostly of increasing women’s greed. Maybe, paraphrasing this, it could be defined “a love potion”. Sidons and Styrians used to dye their women’s veils.

IN ITALY FROM THE XIII CENTURY d.c.

At the end of the Roman Empire,the cultivation of saffron decreased abruptly and we needed to wait for the Arabic colonizations, around year 1000, to encounter again the cultivation of saffron even in Mediterranean areas.

The most ancient documentations about the cultivation of saffron in Italy date back to the beginning of the 13th century.

In Medieval times saffron predominated for its several uses in cooking. Cooks used this spice, not only for its typical taste and scent, but also for the golden color which acquires the food where it was used as a seasoning. Serving so colored dishes was a sign of wellness and ostentation, highly wanted among the lords of Medieval society.

Cardinal Richelieu used saffron jam as a stimulant.

The French surgeon Ambrogio Parè treated impotence suggesting eating saffron risotto.

Along the 19th century, scientists who dedicated to the study of this subject divided into two groups: those who believed saffron was a stimulant for libido and those who believed it was a weakening spice. To realize which tendency ended to prevail you just need to know that in the 20th century doctors tried to treat feminine infertility with this spice.

IN ITALY FROM THE XIII CENTURY d.c.

At the end of the Roman Empire,the cultivation of saffron decreased abruptly and we needed to wait for the Arabic colonizations, around year 1000, to encounter again the cultivation of saffron even in Mediterranean areas.

The most ancient documentations about the cultivation of saffron in Italy date back to the beginning of the 13th century.

In Medieval times saffron predominated for its several uses in cooking. Cooks used this spice, not only for its typical taste and scent, but also for the golden color which acquires the food where it was used as a seasoning. Serving so colored dishes was a sign of wellness and ostentation, highly wanted among the lords of Medieval society.

Cardinal Richelieu used saffron jam as a stimulant.

The French surgeon Ambrogio Parè treated impotence suggesting eating saffron risotto.

Along the 19th century, scientists who dedicated to the study of this subject divided into two groups: those who believed saffron was a stimulant for libido and those who believed it was a weakening spice. To realize which tendency ended to prevail you just need to know that in the 20th century doctors tried to treat feminine infertility with this spice.

“I read university studies on the net and I discover that saffron contains the four basic properties for traditional shaving: emollience, anti-reddening, repairing and tonicity. Yet no one had ever used this spice for the production of traditional shaving soap, the one with the brush ...”

- Fulco Abbate

“I read university studies on the net and I discover that saffron contains the four basic properties for traditional shaving: emollience, anti-reddening, repairing and tonicity. Yet no one had ever used this spice for the production of traditional shaving soap, the one with the brush ...”

- Fulco Abbate